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Thermal monocular for hunting

10 Best Thermal Scopes, Binoculars & Monoculars for Animal Hunting and Spotting – Reviews & Buying Guide

Shopping for binoculars, monoculars, or a thermal scope for hunting?

You’ve come to the right place.

Thermal optics, including scopes, binoculars, and monoculars are great for hunters. They are especially helpful for nighttime hunting and animal spotting where non-thermal optics or your bare eyes are not very helpful.

Thermal scopes, binoculars, and monoculars are not just useful for nighttime use. You can also use thermal optics during the day to spot animals through thick brush, low-light wooded areas, and dark environments such as a cave.

What's in This Guide?

In this buying guide, we review and compare the best thermal scopes, binoculars, and monoculars for hunting.

If you prefer the hands-free convenience of goggles, see our review of the best night vision goggles.

If you are specifically looking for a scope for your hunting rifle, take a look at our most affordable thermal scopes picks.


How Thermal Imaging Works

thermal rifle scope

Thermal imaging, whether in a thermal scope or a thermal camera, works off the same scientific principles.

A special sensor collects infrared radiation from the target object. Infrared detectors create a temperature pattern of the object or environment, what's known as a thermogram.

The thermogram is then translated into an electric signal processed by a circuit board into a display.

You see on the screen or eyepiece are the different colors representing the intensity of infrared radiation collected from the environment.

Because an animal will be warmer than the environment, it'll easily stand out in the final image.

Best Thermal Imaging Solutions

FLIR Scout handheld imager
  • FLIR Scout TK

  • Best for up to 100 yards visibility
  • Thermal Sensor:
    160 x 120

  • Detection range:
    100 yards

  • Magnification:
    None

  • Battery:
    5hrs

  • Video Recording:
    Yes

  • Weight:
    6 ounces

Pulsar Axion XM30
  • Pulsar Axion Key XM30

  • Best for scouting and spotting
  • Thermal Sensor:
    320 x 240

  • Detection range:
    1,300 yards

  • Magnification:
    2.5x-10x

  • Battery:
    4hrs

  • Video Recording:
    Yes

  • Weight:
    8.8 ounces

FLIR Breach PTQ136
  • FLIR Breach

  • Best for helmet mounting
  • Thermal Sensor:
    320 x 256

  • Detection range:
    225 yards

  • Magnification:
    1x-4x

  • Battery:
    1.5hrs

  • Video Recording:
    Yes

  • Weight:
    7.4 ounces

Leupold LTO-Tracker HD
  • Leupold LTO-Tracker HD

  • Best for night hunting
  • Thermal Sensor:
    320 x 240

  • Detection range:
    750 yards

  • Magnification:
    1x-6x

  • Battery:
    3hrs

  • Video Recording:
    No

  • Weight:
    7 ounces

ATN BINOX 4T 384
  • ATN BINOX 4T

  • Best thermal binoculars
  • Thermal Sensor:
    384 x 288

  • Detection range:
    1,000 yards

  • Magnification:
    2x-8x

  • Battery:
    15hrs

  • Video Recording:
    Yes

  • Weight:
    2.5lbs/40 ounces

ATN ThOR 4 thermal scope
  • ATN ThOR 4

  • Best rifle scope
  • Thermal Sensor:
    384 x 288

  • Detection range:
    1,000 yards

  • Magnification:
    2x-8x

  • Battery:
    18hrs

  • Video Recording:
    Yes

  • Weight:
    2lbs/32 ounces

Pulsar Quantum XQ23V
  • Pulsar Quantum XQ23V

  • Best for quick startup
  • Thermal Sensor:
    384 x 288

  • Detection range:
    874 yards

  • Magnification:
    1.8x-7.2x

  • Battery:
    6.5hrs

  • Video Recording:
    Yes via video cable

  • Weight:
    12.3 ounces

ATN ThOR 4 thermal scope
  • ATN ThOR 4 640

  • Best thermal resolution
  • Thermal Sensor:
    640 x 480

  • Detection range:
    830 yards

  • Magnification:
    1x-10x

  • Battery:
    16hrs

  • Video Recording:
    Yes

  • Weight:
    1.9lbs/30 ounces

Leupold LTO Quest
  • Leupold LTO Quest

  • Best budget
  • Thermal Sensor:
    206 x 156

  • Detection range:
    300 yards

  • Magnification:
    None

  • Battery:
    4hrs

  • Video Recording:
    No (Stills only)

  • Weight:
    6.2 ounces

ATN OTS-HD 384
  • ATN OTS-HD 384

  • Best for clear and sharp images
  • Thermal Sensor:
    384 x 288

  • Detection range:
    625 yards

  • Magnification:
    1.25x-5x

  • Battery:
    8hrs

  • Video Recording:
    Yes

  • Weight:
    2lbs/32 ounces


1. Best for Up To 100 Yards Visibility: FLIR Scout TK Handheld Thermal Monocular

FLIR Scout Handheld imager

For people who mostly do close-up hunting or spotting, the FLIR Scout TK is a great choice. You can detect animals, including smaller ones like squirrels, from up to 100 yards out.

Its compact pocket-size design makes the Scout TK easy to carry around.

Pros

  • Great for close to mid-range animal spotting.
  • Compact and lightweight – easy portability.
  • Multiple palette options.
  • You can take photos and videos.
  • Good price.

Cons

  • Relatively low resolution.
  • No magnification.
  • Not ideal for observing moving animals because of the low refresh rate.

Our Review 

The FLIR Scout TK thermal monocular is ideal for beginners or people looking for an affordable thermal scope for basic hunting and animal spotting.

The price is lower than most thermal scopes (especially for a FLIR product), but you should understand what you are getting.

For one, the range is decent but limited. You’ll be able to detect warm objects up to around 100 yards out. In this range, you can make out large animals. For smaller animals like birds or squirrels, you’ll need to be closer to tell which animal it is.

The resolution is also on the lower side. The 160 x 120 sensor produces a good quality image, but only at close range. It’s one reason why the Scout TK’s detection range is limited to 100 yards. Beyond this, the image is too fuzzy.

What we love most about the Scout TK is its portability. It weighs just 6 ounces and can fit in your pocket. The included lanyard makes it easy to carry it around safely when you are out in the woods.

You’ll also love the photo and video capability. You can cycle through multiple color palettes when taking photos or recording videos.

To transfer media to another device, the Scout TK comes with a USB cable that you’ll also use for charging the scope.

The Li-ion battery gives you about 5 hours of continuous use.

Limitations 

The FLIR Scout TK has limited imaging performance overall, which is expected for an entry-level thermal monocular.

The resolution, refresh rate, and detection range are all on the lower side.

Because of the low resolution, the Scout TK lacks any magnification, as zooming in would significantly distort image quality.

If you are looking for a high-resolution, high-magnification thermal monocular you can use for spotting distant animals, the Scout TK is not it.

Bottom Line 

While it does have plenty of limitations, the FLIR Scout TK is perfect for close to mid-range animal spotting. Beginners will also love its low price and ease of use.


2. Best for Scouting and Spotting: Pulsar Axion Key XM30 2.4-9.6x24 Monocular 

Pulsar Axion XM30 2.4-9.6x24 Monocular

The Pulsar Axion Key XM30 is a major step up from the FLIR Scout TK in almost every aspect, including resolution, magnification, and detection.

With a detection range up to 1,300 yards, the XM30 is best for short and long-range animal scouting and spotting.

Pros

  • Long detection range.
  • Waterproof (IPX7).
  • Video and photo recording.
  • Compact and lightweight.
  • High magnification for long-range spotting.
  • Supports live streaming.

Cons

  • Pricey.
  • Fair resolution.

Our Review

The FLIR Scout TK is good but isn’t much help when trying to scout far away animals. The Pulsar Axion Key has a much longer range, up to 1,300 yards, for spotting animals from far out.

It also helps that the Axion Key has optical and digital zoom, helping you observe animals from a safe distance. Optical/stepped zoom is 2x, and 4x that is supplemented by 4x digital zoom.

While zooming, you can engage the PiP or Picture in Picture mode. This lets you magnify your target in a small window at the top of the display while retaining a clear view of the environment.

The 320 x 240 sensor doesn’t have the highest resolution, but it’s not too bad. The only time you might find it limiting is when you zoom in too much. The image gets fuzzy.

You can still take photos and record videos using the Axion Key XM30 monocular. It has an internal memory of 16GB.

The XM30 monocular supports the Stream Vision app. Link the XM30 to your phone via WiFi then download the free Stream Vision app.

You can then use your smartphone as a remote viewfinder, remote control, and video/photo recorder. You can also Livestream your adventures via the app.

The 3200 mAh battery is good for up to 4 hours. Use the included USB cable to recharge it.

As for construction quality, the Axion Key XM30 is designed to withstand rugged environments while being easy to carry around. It has a lightweight but tough aluminum body and is rated as IPX7 waterproof.

Limitations 

The XM30 has a better resolution than the Scout TK. But the XM30 is still limited in terms of image quality. The 320 x 240 resolution proves inadequate when you zoom in too far. You’ll find it easier to get closer to your target rather than relying entirely on the zooming.

There’s also the issue of price. The XM30 is more than three times the price of the Scout TK. If you are looking for a budget thermal scope, this is not it.

Bottom Line 

With its improved optics, rugged and lightweight construction, and live streaming capability, the Axion Key XM30 is well worth the higher price tag, especially for hunters who want to see more than a few hundred yards away.


3. Best for Helmet Mounting: FLIR Breach PTQ136 Multi-Purpose Monocular

FLIR Breach PTQ136 Multi-Purpose Monocular

The FLIR Breach PTQ136 is designed primarily for law enforcement. But there’s no reason you cannot use it for hunting and animal spotting.

The integrated railing allows you to mount it on a helmet for hands-free spotting.

Pros

  • Great for close to mid-range animal spotting.
  • It can be mounted on a helmet.
  • Digital zoom.
  • A high refresh rate ensures smooth images when you are on the move.
  • Good resolution.

Cons

  • Pricey.
  • Limited detection range.

Our Review 

A helmet-mounted monocular is convenient when you need your hands free to hold a hunting rifle. It also provides better spotting when you or the animal is on the move.

FLIR Breach comes ready for helmet mounting. It has an integrated mini-rail for attaching it to a helmet. You do not need an adaptor or any additional equipment to mount the FLIR Breach monocular.

As for the optics, Breach falls in the mid-level performance range. It’s better than beginner thermal scopes but has some significant limitations.

The 320 x 256 sensor delivers a pretty clear image, provided you are not too far away from the target. The maximum detection range is about 225 yards for people and large animals. For smaller animals, you need to be about 100 yards away to get a clear image.

FLIR Breach has 1x-4x continuous digital zoom to get you a close-up view but notes that zooming will reduce image quality.

One optical feature we love about FLIR Breach is the high refresh rate (60 Hz). When you are using a helmet-mounted scope, you are likely to be moving a lot. The high refresh rate ensures you still get a smooth image when on the move.

The refresh rate is also handy when tracking a moving target.

The FLIR Breach can take up to a thousand still images and record up to 2.5 hours of video. Use the included USB cable to transfer media to an external device.

With a weight of just 7.4 ounces and a compact design, the FLIR Breach is easy to carry.

Limitations

The FLIR Breach thermal monocular is not designed for long-range observations. Most users reported a useful range of about 200 yards, less for smaller animals.

Another issue is the price. FLIR Breach is not ideal for budget-minded customers.

Battery life could be better. The 90-minute continuous usage is less than most other thermal scopes.

Bottom Line 

What makes the FLIR Breach good for law enforcement also makes it great in the woods. It has excellent optics, lightweight design, and the option to mount it on a helmet.

4. Best for Night Hunting: Leupold LTO-Tracker HD Thermal Viewer

HD thermal monocular

If you like to hunt or spot animals at night, we recommend the Leupold LTO-Tracker HD thermal monocular. You can also use it during the day, but it shines most in cooler conditions (that is, at night).

The LTO-Tracker HD easily picks up temperature differences in the environment, allowing you to spot even small animals like rabbits at a significant distance.

Pros

  • Great for night tracking/hunting.
  • Multiple color palettes.
  • 6x digital zoom.
  • Lightweight and compact.

Cons

  • No photo or video recording.
  • Poor image quality when using digital zoom.

Our Review 

The Leupold LTO-Tracker HD works best in cool night temperatures. That’s when it provides the best contrast between your target and the environment.

On extra-cool nights, the detection range can be as far as 750 yards. Obviously, it’s much shorter for small game.

You can use the 6x digital zoom to get a closer view of your target. But thermal scopes and zoom generally don’t go well together. Beyond 4x, it’ll be hard to make out any warm objects. We recommend using the zoom feature sparingly and don’t go beyond 4x.

The 320 x 240 thermal resolution is not too bad. It provides decent image quality, but be careful not to zoom too much as it reduces image quality

The CR123 battery provides up to 3 hours of continuous use. Note that the battery is non-rechargeable.

Limitations 

The Leupold LTO-Tracker HD does not have video or image recording. If you were hoping to keep a record of your adventures, look for another thermal monocular.

We’ve also mentioned the poor image quality when using the digital zoom, especially if you go beyond 4x.

The 25 Hz refresh rate is a bit slow, so the image can be choppy when trying to follow a moving animal or observe a target while you are on the move.

Bottom Line 

The Leupold LTO-Tracker HD has quite a few limitations. But for the price, we still think it is a good deal, especially for beginners and anyone looking for an entry-level thermal scope for nighttime hunting.

5. Best Thermal Binoculars: ATN BINOX 4T 384 2-8X Thermal Binocular

thermal monocular

Most of the hunting binoculars you’ll find online are night vision binoculars. They are good for seeing in the dark, but won’t help you spot animals hiding in thickets.

If you are looking for binoculars with thermal, not night vision, technology, we recommend the ATN BINOX 4T 384 2-8X thermal binoculars.

They are pricey but offer the best in class optical performance. You also get a few extras, including a built-in laser rangefinder and video streaming.

Pros

  • Excellent optics for hunting.
  • Long detection ranges – up to 1,000 yards.
  • Long battery life.
  • Video recording and streaming.
  • Built-in laser rangefinder.

Cons

  • Expensive.
  • Heavier than monoculars and scopes.

Our Review 

It is surprisingly hard to find a good pair of thermal binoculars. Most use night vision technology, which won’t help you see through bushes and limited range.

If you want high-quality binoculars, be ready to spend quite a bit of money. The ATN BINOX 4T binoculars are pricey, but they offer really good optics and some nice extra features. Let’s start with the optics.

The BINOX 4T binoculars feature a 384 x 288 sensor that’s good enough to detect animals as far out as 1,000 yards. The recognition and identification ranges are, however, much shorter at 480 and 300 yards, respectively.

Similar to other thermal optics, you can choose from several color palettes for better target identification.

BINOX 4T offers 2x to 8x magnification, allowing to zoom in for a closer view. Thanks to the high-resolution sensor, you can zoom in quite close before image quality degrades too much.

BINOX 4T comes with a built-in laser rangefinder to help you calculate the distance to the target.

These binoculars also have a built-in IR illuminator. The illuminator is helpful if you or your hunting partners have night vision and need better visibility.

BINOX 4T offers both video recording and streaming, both at HD resolution.

6. Best Rifle Scope: ATN ThOR 4 Thermal Rifle Scope

ATN ThOR 4

The ATN ThOR 4 is very similar to the ATN BINOX 4T binoculars in terms of optical performance and features. The biggest difference is that ATN ThOR 4 is a monocular scope that you can mount on a rifle.

ATN ThOR 4 is especially ideal for taking long-range shots. Integrated reticle and ballistics calculator increase your chances of taking accurate shots.

Pros

  • Excellent optics.
  • Comes with a quick detach mount.
  • Built-in ballistic calculator.
  • HD video recording and streaming.
  • Extra-long battery life.

Cons

  • Pricey.
  • Takes experience and learning to make use of all the features.

Our Review 

ATN ThOR 4 is a feature-heavy thermal scope that’s designed to provide better spotting and targeting. It comes with a high-resolution 384x288 sensor that can detect animals up to 1,000 yards out.

The 2x-8x magnification gives you a close-up view, though you have to be careful not to zoom in too much to the point that it turns fuzzy.

For shot accuracy, the ATN ThOR 4 scope has a built-in stadiametric rangefinder that helps adjust the reticle to the right spot.

thermal vision monocular

Some thermal scopes and monoculars can be frustratingly slow to startup. Most take at least 5 seconds, with some taking painfully long to start up and calibrate.

In contrast, the Pulsar Quantum XQ23V is ready to go in two seconds flat.

Pros

  • Fast startup.
  • High resolution.
  • Built-in stadiametric rangefinder.
  • High refresh rate.
  • Long detection range.

Cons

  • Video recording requires an external DVR.

Our Review 

The Pulsar Quantum XQ23V lacks the fancy features of the ATN ThOR 4. But the optical performance is just about the same, for a lower price.

The lack of many add-ons is one reason why the Pulsar Quantum XQ23V can boot up in no time.

The 384x288 sensor is pretty good and delivers a high-quality image in different environments, ranging from open grasslands to thick bushes.

The detection range is 874 yards, making the Quantum XQ23V a good choice for long-range spotting. You can also zoom in between 1.8x and 7.2x.

While not as accurate as a laser rangefinder, the built-in stadiametric rangefinder significantly improves shot accuracy. It’ll measure the distance to certain common animals with known height such as deer, hare, or boar.

You can choose from even color palettes depending on the environment and personal preferences.

If you are moving or tracking a moving target, the Quantum XQ23V’s 50 Hz refresh rate proves helpful. Instead of a choppy image, you get a smooth flowing image that makes it easier to keep up with your target.

The Quantum XQ23V runs on four AA batteries that give you about 6.5 hours of continuous use. To save power, you can turn the display off without shutting down the scope. When you need to observe again, it immediately turns on without needing to boot up.

The Quantum XQ23V can also be set off automatically when it’s inclined, indicating it’s not in use.

Limitations 

The lack of extra features like video streaming and wireless connectivity is actually good for some hunters. It means they can pay less for a high-performance scope.

The one extra we’d have loved to get is video recording. The Quantum XQ23V can record video but only using a video-out cable. That means you need to have an external DVR if you want to record videos.

Bottom Line 

If the lack of built-in video recording is not a big deal for you (or you don’t mind carrying a DVR with you), the Quantum XQ23V is an excellent choice.

It’s also a great choice for hunters and animal spotters looking for an affordable no-frill thermal scope.

ATN ThOR 4

If you are looking for a thermal scope that delivers clear and sharp images, we recommend the ATN Thor 4 640x480 thermal scope.

The ATN Thor 4 has the highest resolution sensor among our picks.

Pros

  • High-resolution sensor.
  • Long detection range.
  • Long battery life.
  • Video recording and streaming.
  • One-shot zero calibration.

Cons

  • Expensive.
  • A bit of a learning curve.

Our Review 

The ATN Thor 4 640 x 480 scope delivers the best image quality of any thermal scope or monocular in our buying guide.

Another advantage of the high-resolution sensor is that you can see far while maintaining image sharpness and quality. The ATN Thor 4 has a detection range of up to 830 yards, though the recognition range is much closer.

The 1x-10x magnification provides easy zooming with minimal loss in image sharpness, up to a point. Beyond 6x, you’ll get some fuzziness, and it’ll be harder to identify targets.

The ATN Thor 4 comes with all sorts of features to make hunting easier and improve shot accuracy. They include One-Shot Zero reticle calibration, a built-in ballistic calculator, and an integrated smart rangefinder.

You can stream HD video via WiFi to an external device such as a smartphone or tablet. You can also record HD video onto an SD card.

Recoil Activated Video (RAV) ensures you don’t forget to capture the most crucial moments.

As for battery life, the lithium-ion battery delivers an impressive 16 hours of continuous use.

Limitations 

High-quality optics don’t come cheap. The high-resolution ATN Thor 4 is one of the more expensive scopes in the market.

Something else to note is that the ATN Thor 4 has a bit of a learning curve. Because it has so many features, it’ll take some time and repeated use to get the hang of everything.

Bottom Line 

Though pricey, the ATN Thor 4’s high-quality optics makes it a great buy for hunters and outdoor enthusiasts. It is also a great choice for hunters that want to record or stream HD video.

Leupold LTO Quest Thermal Viewer

Thermal technology is still expensive. Good thermal scopes and monoculars cost $1,000 or more. But some cheaper options offer decent resolution and optics.

A good example is the Leupold LTO Quest, a small compact thermal viewer perfect for short-range animal spotting and hunting.

Pros

  • Low price.
  • Decent range.
  • It can take and store images.
  • On-screen temperature readings.
  • Comes with a built-in flashlight.

Cons

  • Low resolution.
  • No magnification.

Our Review 

We certainly don’t recommend the Leupold LTO Quest for serious hunters. It’s more of a beginner thermal viewer for those who don’t want to splurge on a high-end scope.

The optics are ideal for short-range spotting and hunting. The sensor has a 206 x 156 resolution, good enough to detect large animals from 300 yards away. For smaller targets, you’ll need to be much closer.

There’s no magnification, as expected, again making the LTO Quest less than ideal for serious long-range hunting.

Instead of an eyepiece display like the one on scopes and monoculars, the Leupold LTO Quest displays the thermal image on a 2.4” LCD display. Buttons let you cycle through different settings, including multiple color palettes.

You cannot record video on the Leupold LTO Quest, but you can take still images. The internal memory stores up to 2,000 images.

A rechargeable lithium battery that provides up to 4 hours of continuous use powers the Leupold LTO Quest.

In addition to the thermal imager, the battery also powers a built-in 30-lumen flashlight, perfect for night use and in emergencies.

Limitations 

The Leupold LTO Quest is an entry-level thermal viewer with plenty of optical limitations, including resolution, image quality, zoom, and range. If you are looking for a thermal scope for serious hunting, this is not it.

Bottom Line 

The Leupold LTO Quest is a great choice for beginner hunters looking for an affordable thermal imager with the decent optical performance.

10. Best for Clear & Sharp Images: ATN OTS-HD 384 Thermal HD Monoculars

best thermal monocular for the money

The ATN OTS-HD monocular delivers a clear and sharp image at a relatively affordable price tag.

It’s a great choice for hunters who want a better view of their target, both nearby and faraway.

Pros

  • High image quality.
  • Long detection range.
  • HD video recording and streaming.
  • Built-in rangefinder, compass, and gyroscope.

Cons

  • Heavy.

Our Review

A 384 x 288 sensor delivers a clear and sharp image up to a range of 625 yards. A built-in 3D gyroscope keeps the image steady and reduces shakiness, especially when you are moving.

The ATN OTS-HD also comes with an integrated compass and rangefinder.

You can record HD video on the ATN OTS-HD. You can also stream live video on a smartphone or tablet to let others share the fun.

The ATN OTS-HD runs on 4 AA batteries that will give you about 8 hours of continuous use.

Limitations 

Compared to other monoculars, the ATN OTS-HD is heavy. It can get tiring to hold it up for long periods.

Bottom Line 

The ATN OTS-HD is a mid-range monocular that’s great for hunters looking for high-quality optics at an affordable price.

How to Choose a Good Thermal Imaging Solution

Trail riflescope

Whether you are buying a thermal monocular, scope, or binoculars, here’s what to consider when choosing the right one for your hunting needs.

Type of Thermal Imager

Monoculars: Monoculars have one objective lens and one eyepiece. A monocular is great if you want something lightweight and easy to use with one hand.

Binoculars: If you find it disorienting to use one eye for animal spotting, get thermal binoculars. Binoculars are more comfortable to use. On the downside, they are heavier and more expensive than monoculars.

Bi-oculars: Thermal bi-oculars are not very common and are expensive. A bi-ocular has one objective lens but two eyepieces. They are more comfortable to use compared to monoculars.

Scope: Scopes are essentially monoculars that you can mount on a rifle. Riflescopes typically come with extra features such as rangefinder, adjustable reticles, and recoil activated video, among others.

Thermal Resolution 

The higher the thermal resolution, the better the image quality. Entry-level thermal imagers have a resolution of about 160 x 120, while midrange imagers spot a 384 x 288 thermal sensor. High-end scopes and monoculars have a resolution of 640 x 480.

A mid-range resolution thermal imager is good enough for most hunters. It provides a clear image, even when zooming.

Detection Range 

Detection range tells you how far you can spot an animal using the thermal imager. It ranges from 100 yards for beginner imagers to over 1,000 yards for high-end models.

Note that the given detection range is typically for large animals like deer and boars. It may also vary from the recognition range.

At 1,000 yards, you may be able to spot something warmer than the background. But to actually tell whether it’s a deer or a car, you’ll need to be closer.

Magnification 

Most thermal imagers offer digital zoom, letting you get a close-up view of your target. Obviously, higher magnification means more zoom. But it can significantly distort image quality.

With most thermal scopes, monoculars, and binoculars, a 4x-6x zoom is the maximum useful magnification.

Some pricey scopes also offer optical zoom. This magnifies the image without losing sharpness.

Built-in Rangefinder

Some scopes and monoculars have a built-in stadiametric rangefinder that calculates the distance to a target.

A rangefinder can greatly improve shot accuracy.

Color Palettes 

Multiple color palettes are a must-have in any thermal imager, even a cheap one. Being able to cycle through different colors lets you choose the best palette for a particular situation.

Video/Image Recording

If you’d like to store and share recordings of what you see through your scope, look for one that offers video and/or image recording.

Video Streaming 

Some thermal imagers have wireless connectivity, either WiFi or Bluetooth, that lets you stream a live image of what you see on a smartphone or tablet.

Video streaming is handy if you are hunting with friends or family. They can all share in the fun.

Battery 

Check the battery life of the scope or monocular. You should get at least 4-6 hours of continuous use before needing to recharge or replace the batteries.

High-end thermal imagers come with high-capacity batteries that can provide well over 10 hours of use.

Price

The best price comes down to what kind of optics you want and how much you are willing to pay.

If you are a beginner and don’t need extra-high resolution or long detection range, you can easily find a good imager for under $1,000.

For serious hunters, your best options range between $1,000 and $5,000 depending on the optics. Higher resolution, long detection range, and extra features like video streaming will add to the price tag.

Conclusion 

FLIR Scout TK features

While thermal technology costs more than night vision, it’s incomparable in what it can do.

For hunters, thermal is the best choice for spotting and tracking animals in all kinds of environments, be it forests, grasslands or snow.

Our entry-level pick for beginners is the FLIR Scout TKAnd if you are on a budget, get the Leupold LTO Quest

Our mid-range pick is the Pulsar Axion Key XM30. It’s perfect for hunters looking for a balance between affordability and optical performance.

Our high-end pick for serious hunters is the ATN ThOR 4 640 if you want a scope, or the ATN BINOX 4T 384 if you prefer binoculars.

About the Author Rob Carson

I work in commercial construction, in Dallas, TX.

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